2020 Atomic Redster X7

The Redster X7 is part of Atomic’s line of frontside-focused, on-piste skis and is designed to offer high-performance in a more approachable, forgiving package than the more-expensive skis with which it shares a category. It uses a Power Woodcore and Titanium in its construction, but Atomic drops their Servotec and uses less metal compared to a ski like the Redster G9, for example. The turn radii of the Redster X7 are closer to slalom-inspired turns than GS, with the longest length (176 cm) coming in with a 14.2-meter turn radius and the shorter (152 cm) a 12.3 meter. These turn radii will help less aggressive skiers typically shorter turn radii feel more responsive with less skier input that long radius skis. Atomic has some impressive race and carving-specific skis these days, and we were excited to see how the Redster X7 lives up to the Atomic hype.

Marcus Shakun tested the 176 cm length and quickly thought it would be a good choice for “an intermediate to advanced-intermediate skier that stays on-trail.” With its 75 mm waist width, it’s definitely more focused on firm snow performance than anything else, and it’s also nice to know that Marcus thinks this would be appropriate for an intermediate-level skier. Marcus didn’t find the same levels of edge grip or stability in the Redster X7 as he did in the G9, but he did feel like it had much more forgiveness. Really aggressive skiers may want to move up the line, but those working on their technique will love it. “Not stable if skied hard and fast by an expert-level skier,” but that doesn’t bother us. That’s what the Redster S9 and G9 are for! Marcus actually thought it was “soft enough to take off-trail” and that it “makes short enough turns to maneuver through bumps and woods.” Good to know that despite its firm snow focus, it can still handle some off-piste terrain from time to time. Marcus also added to his feedback that the Redster X7 “wants to be on edge and not run straight.” That’s ideal for a skier working on their carving technique. The ski’s preference for being on edge will help an intermediate start linking true carving turns.

Benny Wax had a similar experience on the Redster X7 as Marcus. He also tested the 176 cm length, and we saw some higher scores for stability and torsional stiffness from Benny, which makes sense considering the difference in size between him and Marcus. Although stability and torsional stiffness/edge grip both received 4 out of 5, Benny did note that it’s “not as stable at higher speeds as you might expect,” which corresponds nicely with what we heard from Marcus. A lot of skiers are going to benefit more from this ski than moving up to a stiffer, heavier model. You want a ski that’s going to complement your personal ability level and also help you progress. Getting a ski that’s too much for you can slow down, or even reverse, that progression.

For intermediates and less-aggressive advanced skiers, the Redster X7 is going to be a lot of fun. If your idea of an ideal day on the slopes involves lots of fun, medium-speed carving turns on perfect groomed slopes, the Redster X7 is likely your kind of ski. If you’re coming off the World Cup circuit and are looking to break the land-speed record on snow, it’s worth moving up to the Redster X9 or further up the line to the S9 and G9, but this X7 provides perfect performance for a huge percent of the skiing population.

Testers

Marcus Shakun

Age: 39Height: 6'5"Weight: 225 lbs.

Ski Style: Powerful, but playful with the terrain

Benny Wax

Age: 68Height: 5'6"Weight: 190 lbs.

Ski Style: Smooth and creamy, lots of turns

6 Comments on the “2020 Atomic Redster X7”

  1. What Atomic boot is recommended for this ski at 168cm. I’m a high intermediate skier, just skiing trails.

    V/R.

    Ronnie

    1. Hi Ronnie!
      Boots are really all about fit. If it doesn’t fit, nothing else matters. Look to something in the 110-120 flex rating in terms of performance, and nothing with a walk mode. Other than that, fit is paramount. Good luck!
      SE

  2. Isnt that the X7WB model, not the „normal” X7 ? 🙂 same on YT clip…

    Is that model at all suitable for heavier skiers ? Or should I choose X9wb instead ? I dont like X9s’ tendency to speed up too much for my ability. Yet I prefer stiff, stable skis for my weight, eg. preferred Volkl Racetiger SL to Racetiger SC. Servotec might help I believe. Or should I turn tu Salo X/Force ?

    I need one skis for cross-turn activity which is stable and can hold heavier user on edges well. Upper-intermediate level.

    1. Hi Mario!
      2019 X7 was different, but just the WB (75 mm waist) tested for 2020. I think it’d be fine for heavier skiers. I’m 6/2 220 and I only wish it came in a longer length, but that wouldn’t quite jive with the shorter turn radius. For a more user-friendly carving experience versus the X9, and for what sounds like a better matchup for your application, I’d recommend the X7 WB. Force (9 Bold, I’m assuming) is a fantastic ski as well–a bit heavier than the X7 but more inclined for longer turn shapes. Have fun!
      SE

  3. What size should I chose?
    I’m 176 cm tall and on advanced level. I was sking since I was a child, stopped then in the middle of my 20s and started now again with 33 last year.

    I think I should go for the 168 cm version. Would you agree?

    1. HI Denzel!
      I think for your stats and level, the 168 is a good choice. The next size up would likely be too long, as today’s modern on-piste skis are incredibly stable, you’re going to get all the performance you need out of the 168. Have fun!
      SE

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