2022 Ski Comparisons: Men's ~100 mm All Mountain Skis - Lead Image

Ski Comparisons - Ski Reviews

2022 Ski Comparisons: Men's ~100mm All Mountain Ski Guide

AT A GLANCE


2022 Line Blend Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

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WEIGHT

PRICE

171, 178, 185 cm

20 m

133 / 100 / 122 mm

1873 g at 185 cm

$599.95


Overview:

Softest ski on the wall, and by a pretty good margin, the Line Blend is a trickster’s paradise. Built with a Maple Macroblock wood core, these skis and their half-cap construction are about as noodly and wiggly as it gets in the ski world. How they can stand to be bend the way that they do and continue skiing is beyond me, but good for the engineers over at Line for figuring out how on earth to build a ski like this. Think of any swervy type of skiing that can possibly fit in your mind and these Blends are the ideal toy for the task at foot. From nose blocks and butters to tail stands and nollies, these skis are built and shaped to handle the most creative freestyle ski minds on the planet. At 100 mm underfoot, these skis have a decent footprint as well, so if you ever decide to get out of the snow park and ski some real snow, the Blend can get down with that as well. The name indicates as much, with the ability to “Blend” the park and the mountain into one gigantic playground.

Who it's For:

Swerve-masters and jibsters all over the world. Skiers with very loose Achillies tendons and strong ankles will particularly enjoy these noodles.

Strengths:

Wiggle-factor, Noodle-ness, Swerve


AT A GLANCE


2022 Dynastar M-Free 99 Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

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WEIGHT

PRICE

171, 179, 185 cm

17 m at 179 cm

128 / 99 / 120 mm

1955 g at 179 cm

$599.95


Overview:

As a replacement for the Menace 98, the M-Free 99 borrows more from the wider M-Free 108 than its outgoing twin-tip brethren. With a longer rocker profile leading to more of a freeride versus freestyle personality, the M-Free 99 is smooth, fun, and flexible for all-mountain skiing as well as park and pipe fun. Just like the Menace, however, the M-Free 99 is a capable and willing participant in anything that you can find. It’s a great tree ski for here in Vermont, and it’s a better floater than its width may indicate. Built with Dynastar’s Hybrid Wood core, the skis get the Poplar in the main trunk with Polyurethane (PU) material along the sidewalls extending into the ski. In addition, the fiberglass laminates keep things energetic and poppy throughout, while the PU is a stable and damp material. The main story here, though, is the rocker profile and the amount of splay in the tips and tails, making this ski stay up and out of fresh snow, while leading to a turnier overall mentality due to the shorter effective edge.

Who it's For:

Playful skiers who want something equally at home during trick time as it is in the backcountry. With a fantastic blend of flex and energy, the M-Free 99 can do it all for you at a very high level.

Strengths:

Flotation, Freestyle, Dampness


AT A GLANCE


2022 Black Crows Camox Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

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WEIGHT

PRICE

168.1, 174.2, 180.4, 186.5 cm

20 m at 180.4 cm

130 / 97 / 118 mm

1838 g at 180.4 cm

$719.95


Overview:

A ski for the people! The Black Crows Camox fills a great niche in the ski world—the mid to upper-90 mm underfoot twin tip. We have a few of them in this comparison, and they do a great job at being a lot of different things to a lot of different skiers. What sets the Camox apart is a great blend of positive camber underfoot with moderate taper in the tips and tails. This, combined with the vertical sidewall underfoot tapering to half-cap in the tips and tails makes for an incredibly versatile ski that is properly built for the everyday advanced skier. While it would be difficult to come up with one area in which the Camox excels, we’ll just have to state that its best asset is its well-roundedness. Built with a poplar wood core and fiberglass, it’s got a simple core, but the shaping and profiling set it apart. Not a twin tip in the park world, but with freestyle influence, the Camox is a chameleon of a ski—happy anywhere there’s snow.

Who it's For:

You do not put limits on what you’re going to ski on a given day. Could be powder, park, groomers, trees, or bumps, you do not care, and neither does the Camox. You’re just out there to have a good time.

Strengths:

Versatility, Well-Roundedness, Everything


AT A GLANCE


2022 Rossignol BLACKOPS Holyshred Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

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WEIGHT

PRICE

162, 172, 182, 192 cm

19 m at 182 cm

131 / 98 / 121 mm

2011 g at 182 cm

$699.95


Overview:

This one should get more credit. The Holyshred is somewhat lost at sea, adrift among a horde of great 98-100 mm all-mountain freestyle skis. Yes, they’re twin tips. No, they’re not park-exclusive, and that’s one of the great things about them. Fantastic in the woods and bumps, these skis have some substance to them for sure. Built with a poplar wood core and diago fiber mixed with fiberglass, these skis have a good amount of energy to them for sure. Rossignol uses their damp tech rubber inserts in the tips and tails in order to quiet the skis down, and then to add a measure of power and grip, their titanal beam exists underfoot to give good edge grip as well as stability at speed. These skis are very useful and utilitarian, but are also a whole lot of fun. Keeping in tradition with the twin tip and more freeride-orientation, the Holyshred also employs a relatively long turn radius, coming in at 19 meters in the 182 cm length. The 192 bumps it up to 22 m, so these things are equally as comfortable going straight as they are in a more turny format. All in all, the build and shape lead to a fun-loving and fantastic overall attitude for the Holyshred.

Who it's For:

Rough and tumble skiers who love to be aggressive and get a lot of performance as well as playfulness out of their skis. If you like park, pipe, woods, bumps, powder, and groomers, you’re sure to love the Holyshred.

Strengths:

Stability, Playfulness, Confidence


AT A GLANCE


2022 Kastle ZX 100 Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

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WEIGHT

PRICE

168, 175, 181, 189 cm

18 m at 181 cm

134 / 100 / 121 mm

2000 g at 181 cm

$749


Overview:

As a new model for 2022, the Kastle ZX 100 follows in the wider footsteps of last year’s ZX 108. This narrower brethren is built for a bit more all-mountain skiing, but still has the long tip rocker profile of the 108, making this 100 a very smooth competitor in fresh and soft snow. The mix of poplar and beech, arranged in vertical stringers, carries the quality and precision of Kastle skis through, offering that high-end feel and energy with more of a minimalistic build. With fiberglass on top and bottom of the wood core, these skis have a tremendous amount of energy and snap, providing even aggressive expert skiers the proper foundation to push the boundaries. Ultimately, with this ZX 100, it’s all about the tip shape and profile, and how they combine to handle the softer snow. The surprising part of the ski, though, is the amount of energy and snap that it generates underfoot and through the tail. With a lower price point than other Kastle model skis, the ZX 100 has a secondary goal to be a gateway ski to the company for the less affluent.

Who it's For:

Skiers looking for a great soft snow ski with more dramatic than average tip taper and rocker. If you love surfing on fresh snow, but don’t want a super-wide ski to do so, the ZX 100 is a fantastic choice.

Strengths:

Flotation, Energy, Driftiness


AT A GLANCE


2022 Salomon QST 98 Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

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WEIGHT

PRICE

169, 176, 183, 189 cm

16 m at 176 cm

132 / 98 / 120 mm

2020 g at 183 cm

$599.99


Overview:

Loving the new Salomon QST 98. Big time ski crushes going on here at SkiEssentials.com. With a new shape and profile versus the outgoing QST 99, the new 98 distances itself a bit from the Stance series skis, likely the 96 in the case of this 98. With more dramatic rocker and taper, the QST 98 is almost twin-tipped and ready for some freestyle application. In addition, the skis have that rocker profile to help with the drifty aspect of the ski, and it ends up resulting in a shorter turn shape and a quicker and more agile quality. Built with a poplar wood core and cork in the tips and tails, these skis have the energy and snap that the Stance skis don’t quite have. Playfulness abounds in the QST 98, and it does have a lot of soft-snow benefits to it, as one of the better floaters of the group, allowing skiers to maximize the potential and capabilities of the ski no matter what the conditions or terrain. That shape does lead to a shorter-than-most turn radius, and it makes the ski snappy and agile—contributing to a higher level of fun and play out there on the hill.

Who it's For:

Skiers looking for that wider one-ski quiver, this QST 98 does it all. From steeps and trees to bumps and groomers, the versatility is very surprising for something with this rocker profile and taper shape.

Strengths:

Versatility, Flotation, Playfulness


AT A GLANCE


2022 Atomic Bent Chetler 100 Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

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SIDECUT

WEIGHT

PRICE

164, 172, 180, 188 cm

19.5 m at 180 cm

129.5 / 100 / 120 mm

1760 g at 180 cm

$599.99


Overview:

The Bent Chetler 100 has developed a great following over the years, and for good reason. These things are some of the most agile, playful, and energetic skis out there, and the fact that they don’t have any metal in them is pretty darn impressive. Atomic builds the energy into the ski through the positive camber underfoot, and the light weight wood core takes care of the rest. The tip rocker profile is on the longer side, but there’s not a whole lot of natural tail rocker up until the twin-tipped shape. This makes the ski pretty responsive out of the tail, but when combined with the more flexible nature of the ski, it’s still pretty darn playful. Built with Atomic’s HRZN tech in the tips and tails, this ski does float better than a lot of other 100’s, allowing skiers the flexibility to use this in the park, pipe, woods, bumps, groomers, or bowls. It is, in fact, one of the better skis we’ve ever tested in the tight Vermont woods, as it’s able to make quick and subsequent turns with a modicum of effort. They’re playful and fun to the nth degree, and provide fantastic value to boot.

Who it's For:

Skiers both young and old. We see a lot of teen skiers on these raging around the woods, but they’re also more than acceptable for mellower skiers who just want something easy and playful with good energy for all-mountain cruising.

Strengths:

Range, Versatility, Flotation


AT A GLANCE


2022 Armada Declivity 102 Ti Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

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SIDECUT

WEIGHT

PRICE

172, 180, 188 cm

18 m at 180 cm

135 / 102 / 125 mm

1909 g at 180 cm

$749.95


Overview:

As one of the burlier skis on this end of the spectrum, the Declivity 102 Ti has a wide range of applications and abilities that will appeal to a broad group of skiers. While it’s got the dual-metal laminate, it’s more active and engaging than a lot of skis in this grouping. A lot of that has to do with the tail shape, which is more bulbous than most of the competition. This little bump out in the tail gives the ski a surprising amount of energy at the end of the turn, making the Declivity remarkably agile in linked carving turns. It’s not as rockered in the tail as some of the other skis on this list, and that adds to the strong finish of the arc. In the 180, we’re looking at an 18-meter turn radius, so these skis do have the proclivity of being on edge. The tip is a bit different of a story, with the spoonier shape leading to better floatation. With Armada’s Articulated Titanal Banding, skiers are able to use this wider shovel to their advantage, as it’s supple and damp enough to rip through crud and chop while being stable and strong enough to hold a strong edge on the corduroy. A versatile one-ski quiver on the wider end, the Armada Declivity 102 shouldn’t be overlooked on any advanced or expert skier’s list.

Who it's For:

Advanced and Expert skiers who are looking for power, dampness, and stability. You value confidence and quality and a quiet ski for high-performance ripping.

Strengths:

Stability, Silence, Strength


AT A GLANCE


2022 Stockli Stormrider 102 Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

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WEIGHT

PRICE

154, 161, 168, 175, 182 cm

16.5 m at 175 cm

130 / 83 / 112 mm

1898 g at 182 cm

$1249.00


Overview:

It’s telling of a company whose widest ski is 102 mm underfoot, that they value precision and quality in an all-mountain format. The Stormrider 102 is a rarity in the ski world as it occupies the powderiest slot in the company’s catalog. They manage to eke out quite a bit of flotation and freeride acumen, however, and a lot of it comes down to the ski’s ability to flex and bend with a wide range of stiffness and power. The most dramatic part of the ski is the amount of splay in the tips. Versus the outgoing 105, this new 102 is a bit less tapered, but with quite a bit more tip rise. Say what you will about Stockli, they’re all about precision, even if it’s at the expense of pure flotation. It wasn’t too long ago, after all, that a 102 mm underfoot ski would be considered an absolute boat, but now, the construction and shaping techniques are so good that 102’s act like much narrower skis—in a good way. Built with a light wood core and Stockli’s Titec Pro metal topsheet, these things are true Stockli’s--worthy of the praise and price for dedicated all-mountain skiers.

Who it's For:

Precision and quality-oriented skiers who are willing to pay a premium price for a top-end product. You are looking for the nicest skis ever made.

Strengths:

Range, Versatility, Precision


AT A GLANCE


2022 K2 Mindbender 99 Ti Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

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SIDECUT

WEIGHT

PRICE

170, 177, 184, 191 cm

18.5 m at 184 cm

138 / 99 / 123 mm

2061 g at 177 cm

$699.95


Overview:

As one of the more front-side and carving-oriented skis of this grouping, the K2 Mindbender 99 Ti is engaging, stable, and totally powerful. We often refer to this ski as a “Cadillac” in that it is smooth, strong, and capable. These skis have a great combination of construction, with a build made from maple, aspen, and a Titanal Y-Beam metal laminate, these skis excel on the groomers, and specifically in a carved turn. The metal over the edges in the forebody of the ski makes it precise and reactive—when you tip the ski on edge, it really initiates nicely and pulls you through the turn. The lack of metal over the edges in the tail make the ski a bit more playful, but it’s still a business-like finish to the arc. While it’s not the best floater on this list, its strengths lie more in the charging through crud and chop. More of a plower than a dancer.

Who it's For:

Skiers who value stability and power over lightness and flotation. You like knowing that you have a ski on your foot.

Strengths:

Power, Stability, Smoothness


AT A GLANCE


2022 Salomon Stance 102 Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

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SIDECUT

WEIGHT

PRICE

176, 183, 190 cm

23 m at 183 cm

134 / 102 / 121 mm

2049 g at 176 cm

$749.99


Overview:

While the previous ski on the list, the Mindbender 99 Ti, leans more to on-trail performance, this Salomon Stance 102 skews more to the fresh stuff. Similar, though, to the K2, this Salomon also likes to be used in more of a hard-charging and straight-lining format. The longer turn shape of the Stance 102 is mostly to blame, as this straighter-cut ski loves to be used directly in the fall line. Using Salomon’s construction techniques involving their Metal Twin Frame, these skis benefit from two sheets of titanal, with windows open in the forebody and the tail. These zones are filled with Salomon’s C/FX material to lighten and soften the blow a little bit, making the skis marginally more approachable for the everyday skier. In the 183, this ski generates a 23-meter turn radius, so it’s one of the most direct skis that we’ll see. It does operate better when brought up to speed, especially when it’s not in fresh snow. The other thing that stands out with the Stance 102 is the fact that it has fairly dramatic tip and tail rocker. Lower in the tail than the tip, these skis end up being remarkably playful in fresh snow—more so than you’d think with a ski with two sheets of metal.

Who it's For:

Skiers who prefer speed and flotation in the fresh snow. You’re not scared of having a bit of power underfoot, especially in something this wide. Also, if you like bright orange bases that reflect in the snow, you’re in luck.

Strengths:

Power:Float Ratio, Straight-Line Compliance, Stability at Speed


AT A GLANCE


2022 DPS Pagoda Piste 100 Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

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WEIGHT

PRICE

157, 165, 171, 179, 184, 189 cm

19 m at 184 cm

132 / 100 / 115 mm

1905 g at 179 cm

$1299.00


Overview:

This clean carver loves to be on edge. The DPS Pagoda Piste 100 C2 has the build, shape, and profile to make it one of the most accomplished turners of this list. Built with a blend of aspen and ash in the wood core and two sheets of pre-preg carbon in the construction, these skis have an amazing blend of stiffness and light weight to appease the hardest-charging skiers out there. It works quite well in this 100 mm shape, and when combined with the longer-radius C2 shaping, these skis are wider on-trail skis that also have quite a bit of all-mountain versatility. While carbon doesn’t quite have the same type of flex pattern or energy damping properties as titanal, it does have a bunch of energy built in, allowing it to be a great material that does a bulk of the heavy lifting. 19-meters in the turn shape, these skis can handle some pretty darn high speeds, while the tapered shape and rocker profile do just fine in softer snow. If you’re looking for more flotation, the RP shaping versions of these skis are better choices, but for a more business-like personality, these Pagoda Piste 100 C2’s have a whole lot to offer.

Who it's For:

Skiers who spend most of their time on groomed terrain but like a wider-bodied ski for both stability and versatility. Quality and precision mean a lot to you.

Strengths:

Power, Energy, Precision


AT A GLANCE


2022 Atomic Maverick 100 Ti Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

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WEIGHT

PRICE

172, 180, 188 cm

19.2 m at 180 cm

130 / 100 / 120 mm

1740 g at 180 cm

$749.99


Overview:

The all-new Atomic Maverick 100 Ti is a strong and powerful ski that takes over where the Vantage series of skis left off. At 100 mm underfoot, this is the widest Maverick, containing a poplar wood core and two sheets of titanal. These laminates are thinner than most, at .4mm wide, so it’s not a ton of metal, but still does the trick. With a fair amount of camber underfoot, the Maverick 100 is energetic and snappy, and thanks to the new Omatic Core construction, the skis are light in the swingweight as well. By thinning the vertical sidewall into more of a capped shape in the tips and tails, the skis are easy to pivot and get from edge to edge, even in tighter and trickier spots. We had a lot of fun in the trees with these skis, as the HRZN tech in the tips combines with that cap build to make it agile and swift while remaining stable and powerful on more groomed terrain. There’s a bit of tail rocker, but nothing crazy, while the tip rocker is slightly more dramatic, leading to a greater splay and rise. This is all good stuff for pure and versatile all-mountain skiing, and we’re loving the energy and attitude from the new Maverick 100 Ti.

Who it's For:

Aggressive skiers who are looking for something just a bit more manageable than the burliest skis out there. If you love the power and precision of a dual-metal laminate ski, but want something slightly easier to ski, the Maverick 100 Ti is a great choice.

Strengths:

Edge Grip, Maneuverability, Energy


AT A GLANCE


2022 Kastle MX 98 Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

TURN RADIUS

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WEIGHT

PRICE

169, 178, 187 cm

20.9 m at 178 cm

137 / 98 / 120 mm

2107 g at 178 cm

$1249.00


Overview:

One of the pinnacles of precision in this comparison, the Kastle MX 98 is likely the most confidence-inspiring ski on the wall. Built with a blend of poplar and beech wood stringers, these skis have power to start with. Add two sheets of metal and two fiberglass laminates to the mix, and you’ve got a great deal of power and energy in the ski. It’s pretty apparent when you click in and push off, that you’re not only on a very precise and high-quality piece of ski machinery, but also a super high-performance one as well. Surely, something of this price level should perform properly, but it doesn’t really do it on its own—it does require a skilled and attentive pilot to get the most out of it. With minimal rocker and taper to the ski, it does hook up easily, but if you’re looking to glean the best response from it, you are going to need to put in your own effort as well. The tip is softer than the midbody and tail, mostly due to the Hollowtech in the tips, and while this assists with the initiation phase and the transitions, the forgiveness of the ski ends there. Be prepared for burly and strong performance overall.

Who it's For:

Aggressive skiers who spend most of their time on-trail. If you like skiing very fast in wide-open spaces, regardless of snow conditions, then these are the skis for you.

Strengths:

Power, Precision, Quality


AT A GLANCE


2022 Nordica Enforcer 100 Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

TURN RADIUS

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WEIGHT

PRICE

165, 172, 179, 186, 191 cm

18.4 m at 186 cm

133 / 100 / 121 mm

2180 g at 179 cm

$749.99


Overview:

This ski just keeps on chugging along. This is one of those O.G. models that really started/re-started this ~100mm all-mountain ski evolution, and it retains a lot of qualities that make it relevant to this day. Sidecut extending beyond the rocker is one of those things that they keep talking about that doesn’t really make a lot of sense until you ski it and realize what a precise and fun-loving ski this is. It just wants to carve clean and round turns with stability and power, and we’re all about it. For a relatively heavy ski, it’s amazing how quick and agile it is, in addition to being an accomplished floater. We’ve had these in over two feet of fresh snow, and frankly, they do just fine. The extended tip rocker goes well with the low tail profile, creating a good blend of grip in the carve as well as playful flotation. The metal also gives this ski a strong and confident feeling in a high-speed carved turn no matter what the snow conditions may be. Much like the previous Kastle MX 98 on this list, the Enforcer 100 absolutely demolishes crud and chop—plowing through it like it’s not even there. This gives the ski an insane amount of stability and smoothness that is not found elsewhere in such a playful ski.

Who it's For:

Aggressive skiers who like to carve turns through a variety of snow conditions and terrain. If you like the traditional feel of a race ski but are in the mood for some freeriding, these skis should be at the top of your list.

Strengths:

Versatility, Carving Ability, Power


AT A GLANCE


2022 Volkl Mantra 102 Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

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WEIGHT

PRICE

170, 177, 184, 191 cm

26 / 19 / 24 m at 177 cm

140 / 102 / 123 mm

2150 g at 177 cm

$749.99


Overview:

Most of Volkl’s skis that adhere to the Mantra build could simply be referred to as such followed by the waist width. I’m venting a bit, but in reality, this Mantra 102 is very similar to the current M6, just in a wider-bodied format. This gives the 102 more stability and power in a carved turn as well as a bit better flotation in fresh snow. While we wouldn’t peg the 102 as one of the better floaters of this category, it’s certainly got its fair share of tip rocker to help with the float, and the 140 mm shovel width doesn’t hurt either. 3D Radius Sidecut applies to this 102, and allows for a great variety of turn shapes and styles, even with a ski that has dual-metal laminate. The Titanal Frame style of build in the 102 helps to not only achieve a high level of precision to the edges, but also lightens the load ever so slightly to deliver energy and agility to this already burly stick. At its very hearth, though, this is still very much Mantra-esque, with precision and power to spare, not like you’d want to.

Who it's For:

Aggressive skiers who are looking for a stable carver that can plow through the crud and chop. You are comfortable giving your skis directions and following through with them.

Strengths:

Power, Stability, Edge Grip


AT A GLANCE


2022 Fischer Ranger 99 Ti Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

TURN RADIUS

SIDECUT

WEIGHT

PRICE

174, 181, 188 cm

18 m at 181 cm

130/97/121 mm

1780 g at 174 cm

$699.99


Overview:

We were slightly surprised that this ski ended up so far to the stiff side of the wall, and a lot of it has to do with the carbon nose that attaches to the titanal laminate. Carbon is a pretty stiff material, and the way that Fischer uses it in this ski is pretty interesting. From about the mid-body forward, the carbon nose starts as a central spine and widens to full-width in the shovel and tip. At the low end, it hooks into the titanal laminate which extends down toward the tail and becomes full-width underfoot. When hand-flexing the ski, it’s noticeably stiffer in the tip versus the tail, but that’s not to say the tail is soft by any means. When skiing this amazingly versatile and competent ski, it becomes apparent that it really likes to finish the turns strongly and with a lot of energy. We do see the ski drop a few millimeters in the waist as it gets narrower, so make sure to take that into account if this ski is on your list. And it should be on the list of advanced and expert skiers who value maneuverability and carving prowess to go along with their soft-snow whims.

Who it's For:

True all-mountain skiers who want something equally at home in the bumps and trees as it is on the groomers. You want something stiff, but not overpowering that you can ski on all day, any day.

Strengths:

Maneuverability, Quickness, Edge Grip


AT A GLANCE


2022 Dynastar M-Pro 99 Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

TURN RADIUS

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WEIGHT

PRICE

162, 170, 178, 186 cm

18 m at 178 cm

120 / 90 / 110 mm

1906 g at 178 cm

$699.99


Overview:

Another surprisingly stiff ski, this one more in the tail versus the shovel, so kind of an opposite to the Fischer above. The Dynastar M-Pro 99 has a unique build and shape to it that sets it apart from other skis on this list, and it’s interesting both hand-flexing it and looking at the profile of the ski as it sits on the wall. The longer tip rocker makes this ski a great floater, but since the taper is mostly early, and not too dramatic, it has a straighter feel to the initiation phase of the turn. Because of this, we often refer to it as a “skier’s ski” as it does require input and steering to get it to turn. This is not a bad thing, and when you get to the underfoot region as well as the tail, it becomes apparent that the M-Pro likes to finish a turn in a very strong manner. The Rocket Frame titanal laminate supports this theory, with full-metal underfoot and wider metal through the back end of the ski, it’s all business back there, and quite stiff to flex. With a slightly longer than average turn radius of 20 meters in the 178 cm length, these skis make for a great choice in the bumps and trees, while the metal underfoot and through the tail allow for proper carved turns on firm snow.

Who it's For:

More than just dads who ski. This is for high-performance skiers who know how, and like to, drive a ski and tell it what to do. You are not scared of speed, but also want something easy to handle.

Strengths:

Speed, Turn Completion, Stability


AT A GLANCE


2022 Blizzard Bonafide 97 Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

TURN RADIUS

SIDECUT

WEIGHT

PRICE

165, 171, 177, 183, 189 cm

17 m at 177 cm

136 / 97 / 118 mm

2280 g at 183 cm

$749.95


Overview:

On the high-performance end of the spectrum, the Blizzard Bonafide 97 hardly needs any introduction anymore. This ski is one of the burliest on the market—willing and capable to tackle anything on the mountain at high rates of speed. Built with Blizzard’s True Blend wood core, these Bonafides blend poplar and beech stringers to maximize performance while keeping the ski at least somewhat manageable. Double titanal laminates, as well as an underfoot metal plate take the performance of this ski to the next level. While most skis out there have a speed limit, these have a speed minimum. They prefer to be used at 30+ mph, and at that point, they really start to come to life. In the 177 cm length, these skis generate a 17-meter turn radius, so it is on the relatively shorter side on this list, and we think that’s a good thing given the strength and power. Any longer, and you’d likely just be along for the ride. This way, the skier still has proper input as to the shape and duration of the turn. A better choice for groomed terrain versus deep powder or tight trees, the Bonafide 97 is a fantastic crud and chop ski as well. In wide-open bowls the day after a storm, we’re not sure there’s a better ski out there.

Who it's For:

High-speed skiers who love a challenge, whether it’s terrain or snow conditions. You like a ski that is unwavering at speed and as stable as it gets. Size up for true power and strength.

Strengths:

Strength, Power, Stability


AT A GLANCE


2022 Head Kore 99 Skis



AVAILABLE SIZES

TURN RADIUS

SIDECUT

WEIGHT

PRICE

156, 163, 170, 177, 184, 191 cm

17 m at 177 cm

134 / 99 / 120 mm

1830 g at 184 cm

$699.00


Overview:

Amazingly, and finally, the stiffest ski on the wall is also one of the lightest. We were somewhat expecting the Kore 99 to be on the stiff side, but probably not at the very end. With some tweaks to the 2022 model, skiers get more length options (yay!) and the removal of Koroyd (yay again!). It’s a refined feel, that is amazingly a bit softer than the outgoing version, and more skiers will be able to find a home on the Kore 99. Like the Ranger 99, the Kore gets narrower underfoot as the sizes decrease below 177 (and slightly wider in the 184 and 191), so take that into account in your decision-making process. For the weight, though, we’re impressed with the stability and energy out of the ski, as Head’s use of carbon is pretty effective in generating an impressive strength to weight ratio. They work a bit better when engaged and in a higher edge angle turn versus flat. We’ve also found them to be better suited to firmer snow or fresh powder versus crud and chop, where having weight underfoot does make a difference in the stability and compliance of the ski. It’s a quick-turning ski, though, so a fantastic choice for woods and bumps, even with the stiffness—the lightness more than makes up for it in the maneuverability department.

Who it's For:

Skiers who value light weight over stability. You want something that’s both easy to turn and has a high-performance ceiling.

Strengths:

Maneuverability, Torsional Stiffness/Edge Grip, Quickness


Written by Jeff Neagle on 10/07/21

26 thoughts on “2022 Ski Comparisons: Men's ~100mm All Mountain Ski Guide

  1. Thanks for another terrific review! I'm wondering if you can help me decide between the QST 98 and the Bent Chetler 100. I'm an intermediate skier, looking for that elusive 1-quiver. I ski 50/50 east/west and generally stay within the resort. I appreciate fun/quick maneuverability, lightweight, but also carving ability especially in the east. Thanks again!

    1. Hi Kovi!
      Ha! Two of my favorite skis from last year. I think if you're looking at light and quick and maneuverable, you're really talking about the Atomic. For more stability at speed, that does come at the price of weight, the QST is a great ski for sure. I don't think that you'll find the top end of the Bent Chetler, and while it's not that much worse of a carver than the QST, it does have a bit more chatter on true firm snow, but if it's soft at all, it rips turns just fine. For you and your application, I'd lean to the Atomic. Have fun!
      SE

  2. Great reviews as always! You may be planning a comparison like this already, but here is my question... I’m a New England skier, NH & VT mostly. I’d say I’m an expert level skier (IMHO). I’m looking for an A/T ski to pair with Shift bindings, approximately 100mm under foot. My current quiver consists of the Enforcer 94’s for harder snow days, and Rustler 10’s for softer snow, trees, and is my current backcountry touring ski. I’m not a super technical skier, more freeride style. What skis do you think I should be considering? Thanks so much, and keep up the awesome reviews!!!

    1. Hi Stu!
      If you're looking to blend light weight and performance, I'd take a strong look at the Elan Ripstick 96, or 106, if you're looking for wider. Similarly, Volkl's Blaze 94 and 106 are roughly the same split--offering light touring weight and high performance. For a true 100, check out Atomic Backland 100--fantastically light and energetic, leaning more to the A/T side of the spectrum. Have fun!
      SE

  3. Question, why the Ranger 99ti and not the Ranger 102FR? I just purchased the Ranger 102 as my soft snow resort / tree ski with the Masterblaster 96 as my firm snow ski.

    Thanks,

    Pete

    1. Hi Pete!
      We felt the 99 fits better with the "All-Mountain" moniker a bit better than the 102, which leans more to the "Freeride" side of the spectrum. The 99Ti fits better alongside skis like the Enforcer 100, Mindbender 99, and Bonafide 97 versus the 102's similarities with some the wider skis of its group. Hope that helps!
      SE

  4. I currently ride a set of Volkl Deacon 76, and I love the speed and turning ability of them...on groomed runs and ice. But I want something fun for powder/all mountain. I'm willing to give up a little of that speed on the groomers for something that I can turn /float a little while in powder.

    1. Hi Cody!
      If you're looking for a strong-carving ski in that 100mm range, I'd check out the Volkl Mantra 102 and the Nordica Enforcer 100. Slightly narrower, I also put in a strong vote for the Fischer Ranger 99 Ti. Have fun!
      SE

  5. Thank you for all the great accessible information. I'm 180 pounds, 5'9", 60 years old, ski mostly soft snow all over the mountain in Colorado and New Mexico at an advanced intermediate or low advanced level of competency on Salomon QST 92 169 cm skis about 20 days a season. During the storm cycle around Christmas 2021, I skied a lot of fairly deep powder on the front sides and the QSTs didn't perform as well as I would like. Granted most ski days don't follow such a storm cycle. As a result, I'm researching fatter skis, around the 100 cm width, that I can grow into as my ability increases; and even help be a better skier.

    My search has led me to the 2022 Salomon QST 98 (176 cm) and the 2022 Dynastar M-Pro 99 (178 cm). I would be forever grateful for any insights or recommendations you can provide regarding my selections for a pair of skis, and their respective lengths, that will best suit my goal of improving my skills all over the mountain.

    1. HI Mitchell!
      The new 98 is a way better floater than the 92 that you have--more deep taper and extended rocker in that ski makes a big difference. The QST is also more rockered than the M-Pro, especially in the tail, so it is a bit more playful, although not quite as powerful. For more play, go QST, but for more power and grip, the M-Pro is great. I'd say you're right on the money in terms of length in those models. The M-Pro is stiff in the tail, so make sure you take that into account as to whether you want that or not. I'd lean to the QST. Have fun!
      SE

  6. Good Day everyone! I am 23 and new to Freeski! I read a lot of your reviews to help me understand more about the differences, so thank you for that! I am looking to buy a new pair of skis, more playful and freestyle-oriented than my current Rossignol EST. I have a good level on groomers but I often get bored and want to go more into trees, powder, and learn new tricks in the park. So, I was wondering which pair you would recommend considering that and the fact that I am not a fan of carving and I usually ski in Canada where the snow is often hard and pretty icy? That's why I thought that I need something with a wide range and still all-mountain oriented, but as I am not an expert I don't know the maneuverability of new twin-tip skis. I will use them most of the time in the resort but I often go off-trails. I heard good things about the Bent Chetler 100, the QST 98, and the Reckoner 102... Thanks so much in advance guys!

    1. HI Arthur!
      I'd look at the Bent Chetler 100. It's a ton of fun in softer snow and tighter spots, and while it's not the best carver out there, it's still quite energetic and grippy when it needs to be. It's about as versatile and friendly of a ski that you'll find. Have fun!
      SE

  7. Hello, I am 200lbs and 1.87. I am interested in the Kore 99 2022. Which length would you recommend: 1.77 or 1.84? I ski mostly Mont-Tremblant in Quebec. Good level.

    Thx!

    1. Hi Christophe!
      I'd go 184. It's light enough so that you can handle the longer ski, I'd think. Have fun!
      SE

  8. How would you compare the M Free 99 to the Bent Chetler 100 and the Camex? I'm having a hard time deciding. I've been skiing a totally different ski, Cochise, there awesome if I'm on my A game and want to rip but I'm getting older find them a bear anymore. Wanting something easier to maneuver and have fun with. Thanks

    1. HI Howard!
      Camox has some more pop and power to it while the M-Free and Bent Chetler are on the bendier side. They're great in trees and bumps, but the Camox might be more well-rounded and with a higher-performance ceiling. If you're not looking to drop too much in terms of performance, I'd go Camox. have fun!
      SE

  9. Hey guys, love your videos I watch them all the time. Im trying to decide between QST and Enforcer. I currently ride Salomon XDR 88 and im looking for something I can float better with and get a little more play/pop while still having good grip and maneuverability. Any insight you can offer between these skis would be awesome!

    1. HI Brody!
      QST is a better floater, but Enforcer rips harder on groomers. Sounds to me like you're leaning to QST!
      SE

    1. HI Hiserski!
      Bonafide 97, Mantra 102, and Enforcer 100 are right up there in best of class in carving ability in this group. Have fun!
      SE

  10. Trying to decide between the BC 100 and QST 98 and I’m torn. I demoed both this year but on separate trips so I didn’t get the side by side comparison I wanted. I do a lot of tree runs and love to find powder but I also love to rip groomers and charge more than carve on them. What’s your advice? I ski west coast only and get in about 12-14 days a year. I consider myself a strong intermediate skier on the edge of advanced.

    1. HI Brent!
      I skied my Bent chetler 100's yesterday in the snowy woods, and I don't think there's a better ski out there for that application. That said, the QST 98 is considerably better as a carver on groomers. If I were to choose one for everything, I'd take the more versatile QST 98, but since I have other skis, I love that BC 100 in the trees!
      SE

  11. Hey guys,
    Looking to complement my 177cm Monster 83's with either a 186 or 191 Enforcer 100. I'm a fairly big guy, 5'11" 230+ all dressed, advanced but not expert. The last time I demoed E100 it was a 185 (previous generation). Is there much difference between these two sizes? The 186 would work but 191 would make for a great cushy ride unless the new construction focuses this size (191) as a big plank for the 1 percenters. Thanks again!!

    1. Hi Donny!

      You would be totally fine with the 186 Enforcer 100. The 191 like you're saying is designed for that 1% of skiers in the 6'4" to 6'5"+ range. The Enforcer 100 has so much metal in it to that the 186 will be plenty damp and stable for your build.

      Have fun out there!
      SE

  12. I'm trying to decide on a ski to demo and possibly buy for next season. Right now I'm on an 83mm Head Monster and while doing a Big Mountain Freeride camp in January my coach recommended getting fatter skis. Around the 100mm mark. I ski pretty playfully and love doing small drops and side hits. I'm an expert skier, mainly off-piste on chopped up, powdery, rocky mountain double blacks and go into the backcountry a couple times every season. I've been looking mainly at the Bent Chetler 100s but would love further input.

    1. Cove-
      The BC 100 is one of the best all around freeride skis out there. An SE tester favorite, there is not much this ski can't do. Carve, float, pivot and smear. It actually floats better than most 100 mmm skis out there, and can hold on all but the firmest of snow. Keep in mind that you will have to change your style and adapt a bit and be ready for a "softer" ski flex on most freeride skis compared to a narrow waisted ski with metal in its core. But once you find the sweet spot, you'll be hooked! Especially in soft snow and powder.

      SE

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